Kansas City doctor seeing more COVID-19 long haulers with sleeping problems

Daylight saving time begins Sunday. The time change can affect sleeping schedules. One sleep specialist at Kansas City’s University Health said he is now seeing more COVID-19 long haulers who are having sleep problems.”Our sleep-wake cycle is tightly controlled by our biological clock,” said Dr. Abid Bhat, of University Health.Come Sunday morning, some of those biological clocks will need to be reset. Bhat said it takes an average person seven to 10 days to adjust to the twice-yearly time change.”It impacts our mood. It impacts our concentration,” Bhat said.Bhat said it can wear on the body like jetlag without traveling. He said since COVID-19, sleep issues have grown.”People are finding it difficult to fall asleep, difficulty staying asleep,” he said.Bhat said they call it brain fog. The official term is post-COVID-19 fatigue syndrome. Some people who are considered COVID-19 long haulers are getting more of it.”That cannot be explained other than because the person had COVID-19,” Bhat said.He said that COVID-19 related depression is a common factor. In a number of cases, a person’s heart has been damaged by COVID-19 and it’s causing sleep apnea.”We find that it’s helpful to address it rather than giving a sleeping pill, which is not going to tackle the reason why the person has sleep issues,” Bhat said.As for that time change, the doctor said the best way to adjust to it is to start going to bed a few minutes earlier or later in the days leading up to it.The doctor said that allergies and taking the wrong medication can also lead to sleeping issues for people. Daylight saving time begins Sunday at 2 am Remember to set your clocks forward one hour.

Daylight saving time begins Sunday. The time change can affect sleeping schedules. One sleep specialist at Kansas City’s University Health said he is now seeing more COVID-19 long haulers who are having sleep problems.

“Our sleep-wake cycle is tightly controlled by our biological clock,” said Dr. Abid Bhat, of University Health.

Come Sunday morning, some of those biological clocks will need to be reset. Bhat said it takes an average person seven to 10 days to adjust to the twice-yearly time change.

“It impacts our mood. It impacts our concentration,” Bhat said.

Bhat said it can wear on the body like jetlag without traveling. He said since COVID-19, sleep issues have grown.

“People are finding it difficult to fall asleep, difficulty staying asleep,” he said.

Bhat said they call it brain fog. The official term is post-COVID-19 fatigue syndrome. Some people who are considered COVID-19 long haulers are getting more of it.

“That cannot be explained other than because the person had COVID-19,” Bhat said.

He said that COVID-19 related depression is a common factor. In a number of cases, a person’s heart has been damaged by COVID-19 and it’s causing sleep apnea.

“We find that it’s helpful to address it rather than giving a sleeping pill, which is not going to tackle the reason why the person has sleep issues,” Bhat said.

As for that time change, the doctor said the best way to adjust to it is to start going to bed a few minutes earlier or later in the days leading up to it.

The doctor said that allergies and taking the wrong medication can also lead to sleeping issues for people.

Daylight saving time begins Sunday at 2 am Remember to set your clocks forward one hour.

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